Thursday, April 20, 2017

Angelica Medicine




Angelica archangelica is a beautiful and magestic plant in the parsley family (apiaceae) which is native to northern Europe and Syria, but grown and naturalized in much of Europe and North America. It likes to grow in wet places, such as along rivers and shorelines. Although the seeds and leaves have been used, the root, dug between the first and second year, is the primary medicine. The taste and energetics of angelica is pungent, oily, bitter, sweet, warm stimulating, and diffusive, with organ affinities for the lungs, lymphatic system, digestion and reproductive system. It is useful for tissue states of atrophy and depression. This is an oily, nourishing bear medicine, much like it's close relative osha.

Angelica is a warming aromatic bitter, antiseptic, expectorant, carminative, diuretic, cholagogue, tonic, and, some argue, alterative. It's constituents include volatile oils, resin, wax, bitters, furanocoumarins, flavinoids, sugars, arganic acids, and phytosterols. 

second year plants coming up in the spring



Matthew Wood talks about how this water loving plant "brings air to watery realms". In this way, it has been used in cases of old brochitis and pleurisy, helping to dry and warm cold and damp lungs. It seems to have an overall effect of moving fluids, breaking up congestion, promoting peripheral circulation, and opening lungs and skin. This pattern of opening and moving makes angelica useful in cases of swollen glands, congested lungs, and uterine congestion. It can be helpful to relieve cramps, and help to warm and stimulate menstruation.

Gail Faith Edwards mentions that angelica is high in iron and helps to build blood and increase vital energy. This makes it useful in cases of anemia. This herb has a history of use in Europe, going back to the middle ages, as protection from illness and promoter of long life. It was an ingredient of Carmelite water, "a centures-old longevity elixir". 



As a warming and aromatic bitter, angelica stimulates digestion and strengthens the liver and kidneys. It has been used for relief of nausea, gas, and colic, and included in Swedish bitter recipes for toning the digestive system. Matthew Wood writes that it will "stimulate the cortisol side of the adrenal cortex, to increase appetite, digestion and nutrition".
The oils in angelica help to build cartilage and nerve sheath, making this plant helpful in cases of joint pain.

Some angelica species are used sweatlodge to open the skin, but also to open the mind. When the roots are burned and fumes inhaled, this can help to move us into dreamtime, increasing imagination. This definitely seems to be a plant that gets things moving. 


Julia Graves states that "angelica aligns you to walk with your guardian angel", and Gail Faith Edwards uses the flower essence to "foster awareness of angelic presence and for help opening to communication from these realms". She calls angelica a visionary herb, which helps us align with our life purpose.



It certainly is an impressive plant, growing up to 6 feet tall or more and with flower heads like exploding fireworks. It seems to draw attention and folks always ask, "what is that plant?"

This spring I dug the roots of a few returning second year plants. After washing and drying these aromatic roots, my hands and home smelled strongly of unique pungently sweet fragrance. From the freshly dried roots, I made a precious little bottle of tincture that retains this intoxicating scent, and tingles the tongue.

freshly dug roots


Matthew Wood also recommends small dosages for angelica tincture, 1-3 drops, 1-3x/day, stating that while small doses can be relaxing, larger dosages can lead to central nervous system depression. When making a tea, decoct for an aromatic bitter, or steep for a tea that is more astringent to the stomach lining. 




There are also a few cautions with angelica. It should be avoided during pregnancy (though it can be helpful for expelling the placenta after birth). Also, it's coumarin content means it should be avoided it on blood thinning medication. Some seem to experience photosensitivity while taking angelica, and this should be considered as well.

Sources...
Matthew Wood, The Earthwise Herbal (Old World), 2008, pgs. 91-5.
David Hoffman, Medical Herbalism, 2003, pgs. 527-8. www.cshs.com/herbsOfMonth/angelica.html.
Gail Faith Edward, Opening our Wild Hearts to the Healing Herbs, pgs. 65-8.



Thursday, June 30, 2016

This is my Garden

My garden is a riot of life.

meadowsweet

Sitting here at the height of summer, I am surrounded by flurries of activity and everywhere I look there  are creatures and beings singing, eating, dozing, flying, building, arguing, or doing any other number of things. I have watched this small plot of land transform over the years from a simple yard to an oasis. And I can tell you in one word how it happened… plants.

chamomile

The first to arrive were the birds. There had always been some, but once we began planting with trees and shrubs, increasing the perching and nesting areas, the bird populations multiplied quickly. As the trees grew taller and filled in, and berry bushes started to produce fruit, we saw even more species. Our garden ecosystem is home to cardinals, finches, wrens, robins, jays, woodpeckers, bluebirds, chickadee, sparrows, blackbirds, starlings, juncos, kingfishers, owls, orioles, catbirds, mockingbirds, doves, hummingbirds and many more. In the mornings we are greeted with a cacophony of bird song that I wouldn't trade for anything, and our days are filled with their calls in every waking hour.

Trees and bushes bring the birds.

spikenard

This pattern has played out for other creatures as well. As our garden has grown, more of a ecosystem landscape really, life of all kinds has moved in, and it's always been welcome. By day we are surrounded by birds, squirrels, cats and buzzing insects, the nocturnal shift brings out the opossums, raccoons, bats, frogs, toads and snakes. If we are lucky, we catch a glimpse of the bunnies in the morning. Rarely seen, but always present are the moles and voles, chipmunks and fox. In the richly composted soil reside magnitudes of macro and micro critters, and ants are simply everywhere.

All of this makes me happy. It gives me hope that life can always thrive and we can live in harmony on this earth. And all it comes down to is habitat restoration (i.e. build the soil and allow plants to grow).



If you read this blog, you know I have an affinity for the healing plants. My aim from day one in this garden was always to grow, cultivate and harvest medicinal plants. But I have always taken a larger view of my gardening efforts. I never imagined a medicine garden patterned after commercial gardens or farms, with single crops lined up in rows, where the soil is tilled every year and all other plants (weeds) are expunged. My view was more inclusive. Instead of crops, I imagined communities. I wanted a living space, with niches and microclimates, with spaces that invited sitting, and wandering, and tree climbing. I dreamt of multi-storied corners and a sunny spot for the medicine wheel. I used permaculture as my guide and never looked back. The result is an every changing habitat that is home to countless other creatures, that provides my family with the beauty and spirit nourishing gifts of Nature, that feed us fruits and vegetables, that gives my children the places to climb, swim, play and hide that are so precious in childhood, and that provides me with the medicine I need to do my work and take care of my family.

All this happens on three quarters of an acre.

california poppies

There are many meanings to the word medicine. As an herbalist, or wortcunner, I use the word mostly to talk about the herbs and their healing effect on the body. But in my garden, I am awash in medicine. The plants are here, yes. But the true medicine comes in the totality of all the components of life in this garden, from the smallest to the largest. How can I possible describe the feeling I get in my heart as I sit in the shade of a tree I planted 10 years ago (now 25 feet tall) and feel the breeze cool my skin as I hear birdsong and an insect buzzes by on it's way to pollinate the meadowsweet, which I inhale into my lungs and gaze upon the many shades of green, accented by fuchsia, red, cream, pink, orange, yellow and violet flowers? It is a state of blessing.

angelica

This is my garden.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Handcrafted medicine to get you through the winter months...


It's time to sign up...
Winter Sweet Medicine Subcription
Sweet handcrafted medicine to get you through the cold season


Enjoy three months of herbal medicine installments...

Sign up for three months of medicine, beginning in December and stock up on herbal wellness through the dark and cold days of the year. If you would like some local, handcrafted herbal medicine made just for you each month, take a gander at this opportunity to have me make some yummy concoctions designed for cold season support for you and your family.

Each monthly share will include one bottle of herbal syrup and one bottle of herbal elixir. These sweet medicines will be formulated with healing herbs traditionally used for treating and preventing the common complaints of the cold season and building our natural defenses. 


I am offering this share in two sizes

Standard size includes a 4 ounce bottle of syrup 
and 1 ounce bottle of elixir each month
(this is perfect for a single person or a couple)

Family size includes an 8 ounce bottle of syrup 
and a 2 ounce bottle of elixir each month.

I am also offering a shipping option 
for those of you who cannot make it out to our place for a pick up.


Each share will be available for picking up or shipping out on the third Saturday of each month, December through February (three months worth of herbal sweetness!).
Examples of medicines included in each installment are…herbal bitters for digestive wellness, elderberry elixir for immune building, cough syrups, stimulating tonics and others. 



In addition to your sweet medicine, I will also put together an 
informative newsletter about the products in each share and how to use them.

Whenever possible my medicines are made with herbs I grow and wildcraft myself and are always chemical free. Herbs that I cannot harvest myself are always organic or ethically wildcrafted from a reputable source. 

Here's the cost breakdown...
Single/couple share…$70 (with the shipping option…$100)
Family share…$130 (with the shipping option...$160)
Anyone interested can send me an e-mail at nettlejuice@gmail.com to sign up 


I look forward to making handcrafted herbal medicine for you this season!!!

P.S. I'm only selling 20 total shares, so sign up quickly before they run out.
Deadline for signing up is November 30th, to give me time to get the first share together.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Autumn Sweet Medicine Shares 2015


Announcing...
Autumn Sweet Medicine Shares
Sweet handcrafted medicine to get you through the cold season


I am re-introducing my sweet medicine shares this fall!

Sign up for three months of medicine, beginning in September and stock up on herbal wellness as the seasons turn and the days shorten. If you would like some local, handcrafted herbal medicine made just for you each month, take a gander at this opportunity to have me make some yummy concoctions designed for cold season support for you and your family.

Each monthly share will include one bottle of herbal syrup and one bottle of herbal elixir. These sweet medicines will be formulated with healing herbs traditionally used for treating and preventing the common complaints of the cold season and building our natural defenses. 


I am offering this share in two sizes

Standard size includes a 4 ounce bottle of syrup 
and 1 ounce bottle of elixir each month
(this is perfect for a single person or a couple)

Family size includes an 8 ounce bottle of syrup 
and a 2 ounce bottle of elixir each month.

I am also offering a shipping option 
for those of you who cannot make it out to our place for a pick up.


Each share will be available for picking up or shipping out on the third Saturday of each month, September through November (three months worth of herbal sweetness!).
To begin with, September's share will include an coltsfoot cough syrup, and an elderberry elixir to gear up our immune function. Subsequent months will include winter medicines like my gypsy flu elixir, a winter warming elixir, fire cider immune tonic and lung wellness syrup and other healing winter medicines. 


In addition to your sweet medicine, I will also put together an 
informative newsletter about the products in each share and how to use them.

Whenever possible my medicines are made with herbs I grow and wildcraft myself and are always chemical free. Herbs that I cannot harvest myself are always organic and from a reputable source. 

Here's the cost breakdown...
Single/couple share…$70 (with the shipping option…$100)
Family share…$130 (with the shipping option...$160)
Anyone interested can send me an e-mail at nettlejuice@gmail.com to sign up 

The first 5 people to sign up for a share will also receive a free bottle of lemon balm hydrsol!

P.S. I'm only selling 20 total shares, so sign up quickly before they run out.
Deadline for signing up is September 12th, to give me time to get the first share together.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

The Gift Of Medicine

Medicine is a gift from the earth. 



Have you ever thought about that? 

When I first stepped into the story of the medicine plants, this one simple fact just blew my mind. I remember sitting in my little yard, looking upon all the weeds growing around me that I had thought of as nothing more than nuisance for most of my life with new eyes. "You are medicine", I thought, "and I never knew". All this time, the medicine was under my feet, coming back, returning, no matter how many times I refused their gifts. 

Gifts.



The earth offers us her medicine as gifts. It is right there for the taking. How amazing is that? Amazing enough to blow your mind?

But wait, let's examine the meaning of the gift, because I think there is some confusion about this term in our culture. Does gift mean "free"? Well, yes and no. 

In our consumer culture we tend to equate gift with free, with getting something for nothing. But just because something is offered to you, without expectation of payment in exchange, doesn't necessarily mean it is "free". 



Herein lies the difficulty…because we must slow down…drop into our hearts…feel the difference. When a gift is given, especially one we need very deeply. We feel grateful. Our hearts open. A connection is made. A bond. 

This is inherently different than something given for fee, like a pen advertising a bank. There is no bond created here. It is a false gift. A gift not to connect, but to extract. 

A true gift is offered in love, because the giver is aware of the value of relationship, of connection…


like your grandmother baking you cookies.



When I receive the gift of medicine from the earth, I am not taking something that is free. I am choosing to participate in a relationship. And to honor the gift, I acknowledge my part. I want to give back, to continue to participate in the dance of give and take that keeps our connection alive.

Just as we say thank you to grandma and offer a hug, or a drawing to give back, we can give thanks to the earth, to the plants, we can do more, we can enter the dance of relationship.

It is the difference between a multinational company removing mountaintops to extract the coal beneath, taking without any sense of relationship to the land, and the native medicine man who offers prayers, only takes what is needed, nurtures the land, and then protects it from harm. 



We choose the type of relationship we cultivate with the earth. We wouldn't barge into grandma's house and take her cookies, leaving the kitchen a mess and walking out without a word. Why do we do this to the earth? We have forgotten. She is our mother, our grandmother. She has always taken care of us. 

The medicine we make comes from the earth, it is a gift. When we honor the gift by respecting our relationship, our medicine is strengthened. It has the power of love compounded. 

I have met medicine makers who have deep respect for this gift, and I have met those who see only what they can take for themselves. The earth is patient. She keeps giving. Waiting for us to get it, to enter the dance, to hear her song,  to join in the great give and take of life. When we do, we suddenly realize, we are so much more that what we receive.